Year of the ENFP

I received the results of my MBTI (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) yesterday. Forbes had me take the test in 1995, but I forgot what I was, and realized I should have remembered when my McKinsey weenie-colleagues cited their four-letter indicator like freshmen nerds boasting about their SAT scores.

I am now a confirmed ENFP — according to the results:

“ENFPs are enthusiastic, insightful, innovative, versatile, and tireless in pursuit
of new possibilities. They enjoy working on teams to bring about change related to making things better for people. Although the descriptors below generally describe ENFPs, some may not fit you exactly due to individual differences within each type.
Creative
Curious
Energetic
Enthusiastic
Expressive
Friendly
Imaginative
Independent
Original
Restless
Spontaneous
Versatile “

Sounds like the output of a self-administered personality survey or a profile on Match.com. According to a quick Google search, ENFP is nicknamed the “Champion” type of the 16 MBTI profiles. Wikipedia has an entry, which says:

“ENFPs are initiators of change who are keenly perceptive of possibilities, and who energize and stimulate through their contagious enthusiasm. They prefer the start-up phase of a project or relationship, and are tireless in the pursuit of new-found interests. ENFPs are able to anticipate the needs of others and to offer them needed help and appreciation. They bring zest, joy, liveliness, and fun to all aspects of their lives. They are at their best in situations that are fluid and changing, and that allow them to express their creativity and use their charisma. They tend to idealize people, and can be disappointed when reality fails to fulfill their expectations. They are easily frustrated if a project requires a great deal of follow up or attention to detail.”

There, I feel different already.

Author: David Churbuck

Cape Codder with an itch to write

0 thoughts on “Year of the ENFP”

  1. I took that test about 10 years ago when I was in corporate audit. All the career auditors were up crowded together in one quadrant and I was the lone auditor alone in the opposite box. I always knew I wasn’t in audit for the thrill of the hunt (trust me, I was only in it because it was in Paris) — this test validated it for me! I WAS different from the career auditors.

  2. INTJ last time I took it.

    and a high “D” and somewhat lessor “I”, and much less “S” and “C” in the D.I.S.C. assement models. I found DISC more satisfactory than Myers-Briggs. In truth, perhaps understanding ourselves and recognizing others is just a first step. Tailoring our approach to best be received by our audiences’ personality type is the real value. As our instructor said, if you and the other person speak different languages, just saying the same thing slower and louder won’t aid comprehension.

    D = Dominance – characterized by focus on results. Tries to reform the world to fit his / her view of how it should be.

    I = Influence – The marketeer in the group – interested in motivating others, creating enthusiasm and ideas. Wants to effect change through new ideas and other people.

    S = Steadfastness – The people manager – focuses on consistency, organization, process. Less concerned with the result, and more about the journey.

    C = Conscientious – The sage, the wisdom in the group. This person is focused on the details and the data. Often the finance or accountant, the analyst or the programer.

    We all have these traits in varying degrees of balance. What was interesting to me in the DISC assesment was that we were shown as having two profiles – one, our social mask – how we saw ourselves, and tended to operate normally, and then our profile under stress.

    In the end, the value was only partially in understanding ourselves, so we could work on balance, and more importantly to recognize others and adjust our speaking approach to focus on the result, or on the who, or how, or the quantifiable portions in order to be better received.

    I know these things, but seldom remember to practice them.

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