Inflight advertising

I need to read the SkyMall catalogue in the seatback pouch more often. Where else could I learn that there is a massive aftermarket for iPod docking stations, including one ingenious wonder that also holds toilet paper?

Here it is, courtesy of Akihabara.com:

Anyway — SkyMall is also testament to the fact that we live in strange times. This is like the Ripley’s Believe it or Not of junk and impulse shopping disorder.

But I digress — what I am really interested in is inflight advertising. You get hammered with impressions from the second you arrive in the terminal to the moment you escape at the other end. Out of home, light boxes, overhead banners …. the inflight magazines are the haunts of Negotiation seminars, expense management software, the stuff the modern Willy Loman must think about after blowing the big deal in Cleveland.

On USAirways yesterday I opened the tray table for the first time in a long time and saw this ad for Panasonic Toughbooks. I liked it.

And then I covered it up with my tougher ThinkPad and got some work done.

Author: David Churbuck

Cape Codder with an itch to write

0 thoughts on “Inflight advertising”

  1. In-flight stuff sucks so very much, and I’ve never seen any credible–read verifiable numbers to justify the expense and trouble it’s worth. While at Squibb in the early Eighties we did a lot of research trying to target docs–primarily cardiologists and internal medical specialists with a specific program. At the end of the day it would have been more cost effective to put bimbos on a plane with a contact list, tons of schwag, and a months worth of open t-times at snarky golf courses, than it was to do inflights.
    The flip side of this was a very effective in-flight campaign that was done for Petrbilt trucks in gthe 70’s by the late Dick Garvin. Simple campaign, glossy truck with shiny polished rims in the lobby of Barclay’s bank in SF with a lanky but busty model in a sheath dress next to the truck and the phrase”A Touch of Class,” the campaign which started as a print effort in business books kicked ass, The then media director– who served as the model for the Barclay’s Bank shoot–is a freaking genius.

    Chowchilla, have a busload of fun,
    Jim

  2. Airports and flights are just so boring that people are more willing to be “influenced” by ads in such situations I guess (no wonder Douglas Adams stated “It can hardly be a coincidence that no language on Earth has ever produced the phrase, ‘as pretty as an airport.’” ). On the other hand Airlines are always willing to make an extra bug for whatever means they can… You know this better than anyone… or should I mention certain airline company?